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An article by asma GmbH – moldshop

Jennifer Stütz, working at asma in Weitra, chose to become a toolmaking technician. Jennifer remembers, “As a child, I was already interested in technology. I loved crafting and exploring things.”  

In grandmother´s times, a woman interested in technology and engineering was just considered to be a tomboy. This widely-held belief is not up to date anymore. Women in a typical, male profession are still a minority but the trend is increasing. 

Jennifer Stütz, working at asma in Weitra, chose to become a toolmaking technician. Jennifer remembers, “As a child, I was already interested in technology. I loved crafting and exploring things.”  

Those are the best prerequisites to be trained from scratch in one of the four branches of education (plastics engineer, plastic shaper, cutting machine operator, toolmaking technician). Although the share of women working at asma is quite high, the proportion of young, female technicians doing an apprenticeship lies at 1:20. 

Plenty of power and stamina is required to lift the components needed in the mould construction and to operate machines and computer programs. “Highly sensitive women might be wrong here. A job in production is not a cakewalk for girls. The boys have a rough charm. The boundaries between being serious and joking around are quite blurred”, knows Jennifer and adds,” Many of my colleagues are mates or good friends of mine now. I would even get some coffee with them in my free time.” 

The components that require absolute precision, which are a bit messed up, are the most interesting ones. When the parts fit together in the end, the team is thrilled. 

Goals: 

The talent for improvisation is not just important in Jennifer´s professional life. She is a mother of a five-year-old daughter and currently takes Matura courses additionally to her full-time employment at asma. She already passed her maths and English exams successfully and is currently working on completing the other parts.